How It Works:

There are 365 days in the year, split up into 11 months of 30 days each and with 4 holiday "fests" that fall between some months. The months are shown listed on the calendar below. The next smaller unit of time is a "tenday", which is their equivalent of a "week". [in fact, the phrase "a week to ten days" means the same as "six of one, a half-dozen of the other."]

The days of the week:

In Ondileth, the days of the week are usually referred to as:
  1. Firstday - a day of work
  2. Seconday - a day of work
  3. Marketday - a day of work; most markets are in full swing; food and supplies are usually purchased then.
  4. Godsday - a day set aside for religious or family endeavors; called Kinsday by non-religious types (most merchants closed, some labourers work, but only until midday)
  5. Middenday - a day of work; name is shortened from "mid-tenday"
  6. Hafn'mor - a day of work; officially called Sixthday, but called "Hafn'mor" by all but the scholars and purists.
  7. Seventhday - a day of work; often called Kilnday as well, although it's historically unclear if named from bakers, potters, or butchers...
  8. Longday - a day of work; often ended with drinking and feasting
  9. Freeday - a day of rest (for labourers and merchants)
  10. Lastday - a day of rest (for some labourers, mostly craftsmen and skilled workers)
In some of the other lands, the tenday calendar is used, but named differently, and a few of the more remote areas don't even use a tenday calendar.

The seasons:

The land of Ondileth experiences 4 seasons, much as we do. The months correspond roughly to ours (Snowreap ~ January, Coldeve ~ February, etc), with the exception that the festival weeks throw things slightly off later in the year and result in only 11 months.


(1) Snowreap
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

(2) Coldeve
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

(3) Wintersebb
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

-Greengrass fest week-
10
[eqx]

(4) Morningthaw
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

(5) Seedsow
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

(6) Wealsun
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

-Midsummer fest week-
5
[sol]
10

(7) Summertide
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

(8) Thistledown
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

(9) Goodmonth
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

-HighHarvest fest week-
1
[eqx]
10

(10) Leafall
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

(11) Frostfell
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

-Deepwinter-
5
[sol]


Fests and other Special Days:

Greengrass:
Greengrass marks the official beginning of spring and is a full week that ends on the spring equinox. For many it is the first time to get out and celebrate after a chilly winter. There are traditional baked meat pies and onion stews (or whatever else in the larder survived the winter) at most gatherings. Flowers (usually grown indoors in the preceding months) are often brought out and displayed, sometimes in creative wreaths and bouquets. Youth that have come of age over the winter are welcomed into man- or woman-hood and may be taken as apprentices during this fest.

Midsummer:
The most anticipated festival each year is Midsummer as it involves an entire week of revelry and merriment (and, for some, debauchery). Most people flock to the several towns that host these gatherings. The Marketday that falls in this week is the largest of the year and many folks save their money to shop for prized possessions and gifts on that day. The merchants oblige by trying to offer their best selections on that day (although seldom their best prices) as well. Travelling merchants are more willing to deal later in the week rather than lug their unsold wares back after the festival. The summer solstice falls on Middenday this week and is marked with various religious rituals in addition to being a popular night for betrothals and weddings.

HighHarvest:
This festival, which falls near the end of the harvest season, follows the autumnal equinox (which marks when nights again become longer than the days), and runs for a week. It celebrates the harvest and the onset of fall with elaborate feasts that sample much of the gathered bounty. It is a chance for weary field workers to take a break and enjoy the fruits (and so on) of their labor. There is also much traveling about on the heels of the feast, as merchants, court emissaries, and pilgrims make speed before the worst of the mud arrives and the rain freezes in the snow.

Deepwinter:
Deepwinter, unlike the other weeklong fests, is only a half-week (5 days). It occurs in the midst of winter, and the winter solstice (also called Longnight or Deadwinter) falls in its last day. There are usually some minor celebrations and religions observances during this fest.


Marking of the Years:

Years (winters) are referred to by their number dating back to the fall of the Old Gods, nearly six millenia ago. Hence the years are marked by "Fall Reckoning", usually depicted as "(FR)". There have been many attempts to "reset" the calendar on various dates considered by some advocates (mostly heretical zealots) to be indicative of a new era. For the most part these efforts have failed although scholars still run across historical documents that use such alternate systems from time to time.


2002 Brian Bloom, All rights reserved.